Destroying Nature Unleashes Infectious Diseases – The New York Times

“A critical example is a developing model of infectious disease that shows that most epidemics — AIDS, Ebola, West Nile, SARS, Lyme disease and hundreds more that have occurred over the last several decades — don’t just happen. They are a result of things people do to nature.

Disease, it turns out, is largely an environmental issue.”

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Warfarin and Chinese Herbs: Concern or Knee-jerk Conservatism?

These studies support my clinical experience, and are in line with others that have concluded many common herbs are safe to use with warfarin. There is a prevailing trend to over focus on in vitro studies and theoretical concerns about drug-herb interactions that do not account for the complex interactions found in Chinese herbal formulations.

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Mortality in vegetarians and comparable nonvegetarians in the United Kingdom

The study involved a pooled analysis of data from 2 prospective studies that included 60,310 persons living in the United Kingdom. Mortality by diet group for each of 18 common causes of death was estimated with the use of Cox proportional hazards models. The study concluded that UK–based vegetarians and comparable nonvegetarians have similar all-cause mortality. Differences found for specific causes of death merit further investigation.

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Protective effects of ginseng on neurological disorders

This is particularly important when discussing ginseng since it helps explain why previous studies have yielded contradictory or inconclusive results when studying the affects of ginseng on a study group. Not only does American ginseng itself vary significantly based on its genetic lineage and environmental rearing, but the study subjects themselves have variant microbiomes that produce different, sometimes opposite, results. Undoubtedly this process is it play in other herbs and medicines as well.

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Antibiotics Can Change the Gut Microbiome for Up to a Year – The Atlantic

Doctors and patients alike should be thoughtful about starting antibiotics—not only because of the well-publicized resistant bacteria that are proliferating thanks to overuse of those drugs, but also because, a new study illustrates, there could be serious consequences for the individual. As well as for, you know, humanity in general.

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