The Technician and the Scholar Physician – by Z’ev Rosenberg

Chinese medicine is based largely on scholarship and a literary tradition, with the requirement to study essential classical texts, quote and debate them. The foundations of Chinese medicine are based on principles (yin yang, five phase, six channels) that require a philosophical and philological approach to the body of knowledge. Traditionally, a physician-in-training needed to study such texts as the Su Wen/Simple Questions, Ling Shu/Divine Pivot, and Nan Jing/Classic of Difficulties to understand channel/connecting vessel theory, the Shang Han Za Bing Lun/Treatise on Cold Damage and Miscellaneous Diseases to diagnose progressions of disease parts and practice internal medicine.

Read Article →

Case History: A Year With Acupuncture 40 y/o Male, 30+ Year History of Autoimmune Disorder

The patient presented with a complex array of symptoms that could easily overwhelm a practitioner or confuse the diagnosis. However, the presentation painted a clear picture of weakened Center Qi and an accumulation of dampness and heat in the Liver and Gallbladder systems. The tongue color confirmed the illness and the pulse its location. When treating the Liver one cannot address it solely or directly – restoring the Spleen is paramount. Akin to growing a garden this process takes time, the efficacy of which is clearly portrayed in the case history.

Read Article →

TCM and Biomedicine, Two Views on Immune System Dynamics

In order to prevent one from becoming ill one of the goal’s is to not harbor wind, cold, heat, dry, or damp within the body. In TCM one gets sick when they possess an internal element that resonates with an external; if it’s not there then you don’t get sick. This is a principle of physics called Resonance, and it is the foundation for preventative medicine.

Read Article →

Why You Should Avoid Ice for a Sprained Ankle – Consumer Reports

Research is catching up to Classical Chinese Medicine. Gabe Mirkin, M.D., author of  “The Sports Medicine Book,” where the RICE acronym first appeared in 1978, has changed his recommendation after reviewing the latest research. For example, a study published in 2014 by the European Society of Sports Traumatology, Knee Surgery & Arthroscopy found that putting ice on injured tissue shuts off the blood supply that brings in healing cells. “Ice doesn’t increase healing—it delays it.”

Read Article →

Is the Autoimmune Paleo Diet Legit? – US News

This diet certainly doesn’t make sense from a Chinese medical perspective, which asks us to eat with the environment, seasons, a balance of foods, and, of course the individual constitutions of our patients. The Su Wen and other medical classics such as the Qian Jin Yao Fang all suggest that whole grains are the staple food of humanity, not meat.

Read Article →